On-Campus Destruction

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On-Campus Destruction

Thomas Birch

Thomas Birch

Thomas Birch

Samilla Larkin, Staff Writer

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 “Hectic Hoco” has finally passed but this sweet season has left a bitter taste in the mouths of leadership students everywhere. The long hours and dedication spent trying to promote the homecoming spirit have gone to waste.

 One of the most visual Heritage traditions is the SLC decorating. Decorating takes place in the SLCs and is inclusive to the entire student body. The goal is to decorate the SLC assigned to your class (seniors get D, juniors C, sophomores B, and freshman A) in attempts to win the SLC decorating competition. All SLCs are decorated by students voluntarily and on the Saturday before Hoco week. Leadership students start making the decorations 3 weeks before that Saturday which is also open to the entire student body. Students then have from 10am to 4pm to finish decorating. It’s a one-day thing to help promote the homecoming atmosphere.

 All the time and effort is seen for about 2 days before they are torn down. It happens every year. Some students decide they don’t like the decorations or they are bothered by them and take the liberty of tearing them down instead of waiting for after the homecoming dance when they are scheduled to come down.

 While some people who participated in decorations say things like “it’s no big deal they’re just decorations” others feel completely different.

 Bridgette Garcia, 11, “It’s really sad because a lot of time, effort, and supplies, are wasted. It makes me feel really bad.”

 The people who put up decorations mind the destruction the most. They believe these acts are rude and uncalled for. They see the work they put in taken down and deliberately destroyed when there is no logical reason for this. Students are supervised to make sure nothing offensive is put up and no complaints have been made about any decorations.

 Joey Miller, 11, believes the students who do these things “Don’t care about the enjoyment of others, the school, or the hard work of others.”

 This is a popular opinion of those that have actually put in time to try and make the campus a better place. Some outside students don’t share the same attitude.

 Charles Stanford, 12, says “I don’t really care some of the decorations aren’t creative and are the same  as last year.”

 This attitude is probably the same in those that

 Homecoming is now over and the decorations have been forgotten but the attitudes have already been formed for next year. If students go in the next Homecoming season with this attitude it will only get worse for everyone. Traditions may end with fewer people willing to go to decorating knowing the work might get torn down.

 We may be walking into a much blander Heritage if this decoration destruction doesn’t stop.